Turnbull government wrong on domestic violence leave

Labor welcomes the Australia Institute, Centre for Future Work research released today, which states that domestic violence leave won't disrupt Australia's economy, and flies in the face of the erroneous claims from the Turnbull government.

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THE HON BRENDAN O’CONNOR MP

SHADOW MINISTER FOR EMPLOYMENT

AND WORKPLACE RELATIONS


TERRI BUTLER MP

SHADOW ASSISTANT MINISTER FOR PREVENTING FAMILY VIOLENCE

MEMBER FOR GRIFFITH



TURNBULL GOVERNMENT WRONG ON DOMESTIC VIOLENCE LEAVE 


Labor welcomes the Australia Institute, Centre for Future Work research released today, which states that domestic violence leave won't disrupt Australia's economy, and flies in the face of the erroneous claims from the Turnbull government.

The research shows that domestic violence leave wage payouts would be equivalent to less than one-fiftieth of 1 per cent (0.02 per cent) of existing payrolls.

This directly challenges the callous comments from Finance Minister Matthias Cormann who rejected domestic violence leave saying, "We just believe it's another cost on our economy that will have an impact on our international competitiveness."

The research shows that only about 1.5 percent of female employees, and around 0.3 percent of male employees, are likely to utilise paid domestic leave provisions in any given year.

The costs to employers associated with those payouts are likely to be largely or completely offset by benefits to employers associated with the provision of paid domestic violence leave: including reduced turnover and improved productivity.

Senator Cormann is obviously confused: it’s domestic violence, not domestic violence leave, that costs our economy and harms our international competitiveness.

Domestic violence costs Australia an estimated $13 billion annually, according to KPMG’s 2009 research. Policies aimed at reducing domestic violence and supporting victims and survivors will help alleviate the impost on our economy. More importantly, they’ll save lives.

Labor welcomes the many employers, their workforces and unions who have agreed on arrangements to support victims of domestic and family violence.

More than a year ago, Labor committed to making domestic and family violence leave a universal workplace right, by providing for a minimum of five days paid domestic and family violence leave in the National Employment Standards (NES). 

 

If you cover this story, or any story regarding violence against women and children, please include the following tagline:

*** If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault or family violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au. In an emergency, call 000” ***

 

THURSDAY, 22 DECEMBER 2016

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